Apocrypha


Apocrypha
   Hidden, spurious, the name given to certain ancient books which found a place in the LXX. and Latin Vulgate versions of the Old Testament, and were appended to all the great translations made from them in the sixteenth century, but which have no claim to be regarded as in any sense parts of the inspired Word.
   1) They are not once quoted by the New Testament writers, who frequently quote from the LXX. Our Lord and his apostles confirmed by their authority the ordinary Jewish canon, which was the same in all respects as we now have it.
   2) These books were written not in Hebrew but in Greek, and during the "period of silence," from the time of Malachi, after which oracles and direct revelations from God ceased till the Christian era.
   3) The contents of the books themselves show that they were no part of Scripture. The Old Testament Apocrypha consists of fourteen books, the chief of which are the Books of the Maccabees (q.v.), the Books of Esdras, the Book of Wisdom, the Book of Baruch, the Book of Esther, Ecclesiasticus, Tobit, Judith, etc.
   The New Testament Apocrypha consists of a very extensive literature, which bears distinct evidences of its non-apostolic origin, and is utterly unworthy of regard.

Easton's Bible Dictionary. . 1897.

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  • Apocrypha — (from the Greek word Polytonic|ἀπόκρυφα, meaning those having been hidden away [Specifically, Polytonic|ἀπόκρυφα is the neuter plural of ἀπόκρυφος, a participle derived from the verb ἀποκρύπτω [infinitive: ἀποκρύπτειν] , to hide something away .] …   Wikipedia

  • Apocrypha — • A long article with a comments on each Apocryphal book. Classified according to origin Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Apocrypha     Apocrypha      …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Apocrypha — A*poc ry*pha, n. pl., but often used as sing. with pl. {Apocryphas}. [L. apocryphus apocryphal, Gr. ? hidden, spurious, fr. ? to hide; ? from + ? to hide.] 1. Something, as a writing, that is of doubtful authorship or authority; formerly used… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Apocrypha — ► PLURAL NOUN (treated as sing. or pl. ) ▪ those books of the Old Testament not accepted as part of Hebrew scripture and excluded from the Protestant Bible at the Reformation. ORIGIN from Latin apocrypha scripta hidden writings …   English terms dictionary

  • apocrypha — [ə päk′rə fə] pl.n. [ME apocrifa < LL(Ec) apocrypha (pl. of apocryphus) < Gr apokryphos, hidden, obscure < apokryptein < apo , away + kryptein, to hide: see CRYPT] 1. any writings, anecdotes, etc., of doubtful authenticity or… …   English World dictionary

  • APOCRYPHA — sic libri dicti, qui publice primo non legebantur in Ecclesia. Ludovicus Vives, in l. 1.5. de Civ. Dei c. 23. Vel, quia apud Iudaeos, a facra illa crypta, in qua libri Canonici asser vabantur, abfuerunt: Augustin. l. 11. contra Faustum, c. 2.… …   Hofmann J. Lexicon universale

  • Apocrypha — Apocrypha, the a collection of Jewish writings which form part of the ↑Old Testament in some bibles. They do not appear in the ↑Hebrew bible, or many modern bibles …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • Apocrypha — late 14c., neuter plural of L.L. apocryphus secret, not approved for public reading, from Gk. apokryphos hidden; obscure, thus (books) of unknown authorship (especially those included in the Septuagint and Vulgate but not originally written in… …   Etymology dictionary

  • Apocrypha —    The term Apocrypha generally refers to those ancient Hebrew books that were originally included in the Latin Vulgate Bible compiled and edited by St. Jerome (c. 347 419/420), even though they were not considered canonical by most Jews at the… …   Encyclopedia of Protestantism

  • apocrypha — /euh pok reuh feuh/, n. (often used with a sing. v.) 1. (cap.) a group of 14 books, not considered canonical, included in the Septuagint and the Vulgate as part of the Old Testament, but usually omitted from Protestant editions of the Bible. See… …   Universalium

  • Apocrypha — After the Fall of Jerusalem (70 CE) the future of Judaism was maintained by rabbis of the Pharisaic tradition. They accepted as authoritative the twenty four books of the Hebrew scriptures but rejected a number of Jewish works which were used in… …   Dictionary of the Bible